Cosmic Appalachia

Cosmic Appalachia

Posts tagged “Disney”

izzymar:

Disney Fine Art: “Ohana means family" by Heather Theurer:)
(Source: disneyfineart.com)

Reblogging for a fellow Disney fan in Hawaii. :)

izzymar:

Disney Fine Art: “Ohana means family" by Heather Theurer:)

(Source: disneyfineart.com)

Reblogging for a fellow Disney fan in Hawaii. :)

(via nerdsandgamersftw)

thebackyardissue:

hicstreme:

dat ice

LOVE!

This might be my favorite Jack Frost/Elsa fanart ever.
thebackyardissue:

hicstreme:

dat ice

LOVE!

This might be my favorite Jack Frost/Elsa fanart ever.
thebackyardissue:

hicstreme:

dat ice

LOVE!

This might be my favorite Jack Frost/Elsa fanart ever.
thebackyardissue:

hicstreme:

dat ice

LOVE!

This might be my favorite Jack Frost/Elsa fanart ever.

thebackyardissue:

hicstreme:

dat ice

LOVE!

This might be my favorite Jack Frost/Elsa fanart ever.

Hahaha I love it!
Hahaha I love it!
Hahaha I love it!
Hahaha I love it!

Hahaha I love it!

(via juliajm15)

theladyelsa:

Disney released a multilingual version of “Let It Go”
Languages heard in order:

English
French
German
Dutch
Mandarin
Swedish
Japanese
Latin American Spanish
Polish
Hungarian
Castilian Spanish
Catalan
Italian
Korean
Serbian
Cantonese
Portuguese
Bahasa Malaysia
Russian
Danish
Bulgarian
Norwegian
Thai
Canadian French
Flemish

download: box | mf

What a fun treat for fans!


You showed me that you loved me, and I suddenly felt free—and truly glad I didn’t have a sister more like me.

Awww.

You showed me that you loved me, and I suddenly felt free—and truly glad I didn’t have a sister more like me.

Awww.

You showed me that you loved me, and I suddenly felt free—and truly glad I didn’t have a sister more like me.

Awww.

You showed me that you loved me, and I suddenly felt free—and truly glad I didn’t have a sister more like me.

Awww.

You showed me that you loved me, and I suddenly felt free—and truly glad I didn’t have a sister more like me.

Awww.

You showed me that you loved me, and I suddenly felt free—and truly glad I didn’t have a sister more like me.

Awww.

You showed me that you loved me, and I suddenly felt free—and truly glad I didn’t have a sister more like me.

Awww.

You showed me that you loved me, and I suddenly felt free—and truly glad I didn’t have a sister more like me.

Awww.

You showed me that you loved me, and I suddenly felt free—and truly glad I didn’t have a sister more like me.

Awww.

(via ohsofili)

airagorncharda:

“Historically speaking, animating female characters are really, really difficult, ’cause they have to go through these range of emotions, but they’re very, very — you have to keep them pretty and they’re very sensitive to — you can get them off a model very quickly. So, having a film with two hero female characters was really tough, and having them both in the scene and look very different if they’re echoing the same expression; that Elsa looking angry looks different from Anna being angry.” — Lino Disalvo on animating Frozen, explaining (essentially) why they removed all the female supporting characters and replaced them with men. [[edited for accuracy]]
Yeah, I call bullshit.

Amid Amidi has a great analysis and criticism of this comment on the blog Cartoon Brew; I highly recommend it. I find this double standard and inherited bias infuriating, and I wonder if this is part of why we had to wait until Brave (2012) to get a really complex and interesting look at a mother-daughter relationship in a mainstream cartoon movie for kids (as opposed to a father-daughter relationship). How irritating. And evil.
airagorncharda:

“Historically speaking, animating female characters are really, really difficult, ’cause they have to go through these range of emotions, but they’re very, very — you have to keep them pretty and they’re very sensitive to — you can get them off a model very quickly. So, having a film with two hero female characters was really tough, and having them both in the scene and look very different if they’re echoing the same expression; that Elsa looking angry looks different from Anna being angry.” — Lino Disalvo on animating Frozen, explaining (essentially) why they removed all the female supporting characters and replaced them with men. [[edited for accuracy]]
Yeah, I call bullshit.

Amid Amidi has a great analysis and criticism of this comment on the blog Cartoon Brew; I highly recommend it. I find this double standard and inherited bias infuriating, and I wonder if this is part of why we had to wait until Brave (2012) to get a really complex and interesting look at a mother-daughter relationship in a mainstream cartoon movie for kids (as opposed to a father-daughter relationship). How irritating. And evil.
airagorncharda:

“Historically speaking, animating female characters are really, really difficult, ’cause they have to go through these range of emotions, but they’re very, very — you have to keep them pretty and they’re very sensitive to — you can get them off a model very quickly. So, having a film with two hero female characters was really tough, and having them both in the scene and look very different if they’re echoing the same expression; that Elsa looking angry looks different from Anna being angry.” — Lino Disalvo on animating Frozen, explaining (essentially) why they removed all the female supporting characters and replaced them with men. [[edited for accuracy]]
Yeah, I call bullshit.

Amid Amidi has a great analysis and criticism of this comment on the blog Cartoon Brew; I highly recommend it. I find this double standard and inherited bias infuriating, and I wonder if this is part of why we had to wait until Brave (2012) to get a really complex and interesting look at a mother-daughter relationship in a mainstream cartoon movie for kids (as opposed to a father-daughter relationship). How irritating. And evil.
airagorncharda:

“Historically speaking, animating female characters are really, really difficult, ’cause they have to go through these range of emotions, but they’re very, very — you have to keep them pretty and they’re very sensitive to — you can get them off a model very quickly. So, having a film with two hero female characters was really tough, and having them both in the scene and look very different if they’re echoing the same expression; that Elsa looking angry looks different from Anna being angry.” — Lino Disalvo on animating Frozen, explaining (essentially) why they removed all the female supporting characters and replaced them with men. [[edited for accuracy]]
Yeah, I call bullshit.

Amid Amidi has a great analysis and criticism of this comment on the blog Cartoon Brew; I highly recommend it. I find this double standard and inherited bias infuriating, and I wonder if this is part of why we had to wait until Brave (2012) to get a really complex and interesting look at a mother-daughter relationship in a mainstream cartoon movie for kids (as opposed to a father-daughter relationship). How irritating. And evil.
airagorncharda:

“Historically speaking, animating female characters are really, really difficult, ’cause they have to go through these range of emotions, but they’re very, very — you have to keep them pretty and they’re very sensitive to — you can get them off a model very quickly. So, having a film with two hero female characters was really tough, and having them both in the scene and look very different if they’re echoing the same expression; that Elsa looking angry looks different from Anna being angry.” — Lino Disalvo on animating Frozen, explaining (essentially) why they removed all the female supporting characters and replaced them with men. [[edited for accuracy]]
Yeah, I call bullshit.

Amid Amidi has a great analysis and criticism of this comment on the blog Cartoon Brew; I highly recommend it. I find this double standard and inherited bias infuriating, and I wonder if this is part of why we had to wait until Brave (2012) to get a really complex and interesting look at a mother-daughter relationship in a mainstream cartoon movie for kids (as opposed to a father-daughter relationship). How irritating. And evil.
airagorncharda:

“Historically speaking, animating female characters are really, really difficult, ’cause they have to go through these range of emotions, but they’re very, very — you have to keep them pretty and they’re very sensitive to — you can get them off a model very quickly. So, having a film with two hero female characters was really tough, and having them both in the scene and look very different if they’re echoing the same expression; that Elsa looking angry looks different from Anna being angry.” — Lino Disalvo on animating Frozen, explaining (essentially) why they removed all the female supporting characters and replaced them with men. [[edited for accuracy]]
Yeah, I call bullshit.

Amid Amidi has a great analysis and criticism of this comment on the blog Cartoon Brew; I highly recommend it. I find this double standard and inherited bias infuriating, and I wonder if this is part of why we had to wait until Brave (2012) to get a really complex and interesting look at a mother-daughter relationship in a mainstream cartoon movie for kids (as opposed to a father-daughter relationship). How irritating. And evil.

airagorncharda:

“Historically speaking, animating female characters are really, really difficult, ’cause they have to go through these range of emotions, but they’re very, very — you have to keep them pretty and they’re very sensitive to — you can get them off a model very quickly. So, having a film with two hero female characters was really tough, and having them both in the scene and look very different if they’re echoing the same expression; that Elsa looking angry looks different from Anna being angry.”Lino Disalvo on animating Frozen, explaining (essentially) why they removed all the female supporting characters and replaced them with men. [[edited for accuracy]]

Yeah, I call bullshit.

Amid Amidi has a great analysis and criticism of this comment on the blog Cartoon Brew; I highly recommend it. I find this double standard and inherited bias infuriating, and I wonder if this is part of why we had to wait until Brave (2012) to get a really complex and interesting look at a mother-daughter relationship in a mainstream cartoon movie for kids (as opposed to a father-daughter relationship). How irritating. And evil.

(via internetgazer)

Queen Elsa of Arendelle.

Queen Elsa of Arendelle.

My favorite thing about the “act of true love” in Frozen:

Read More

Frozen really dropped the ball with Hans

attackonpalindrome:

Having watched the movie twice now, I’m struck by how they could have made him into a really complex and fascinating villain instead of…what we got. As it stands, the writing with him feels super inconsistent re: before and after the reveal. We see him doing things that don’t add up if everything…

Okay, some serious spoilers up ahead, so if you haven’t seen Frozen yet (and you should see it!), don’t read on.

Still with me? Okay.

I do think that the big reveal is a bit abrupt, especially with how completely different Hans acts towards the beginning of the film. It could have been handled with a bit more grace and complexity, but I have a feeling that several scenes have been cut from the film. The “That’s no blizzard - that’s my sister!” dialogue from the trailer is probably the most obvious one, but I had a feeling that some pieces of the Hans story were also absent. We do get a couple warning signs, though:

  • Hans’ tales about his childhood: How two of his brothers pretended he was invisible for two years, how he was basically destined to be ignored and penniless. That’s definitely enough to make someone desperate for power.  Hans even says in the same song he’s been looking his whole life for somewhere to belong. Has he been to other kingdoms? How many princesses has he tried to woo?
  • Prince Hans is really almost too good to be true. He acts exactly like a very traditional, early-Disney Prince Charming in every way, going out of his way to woo the inexperienced Anna with thoughts of instant true love, which everyone around her points out is crazy and probably a falsehood. Surprise! It is.
  • I sort of think his similarity to early Prince Charmings is also a warning. Our earliest princes kissed dead people, creeped up on singing girls in the forest, and forced every young woman in their kingdom to try on a shoe. These people share Hans’ single-minded, aggressive pursuit of a goal.
  • When Hans is left in control of Arendelle, he threatens anyone who opposes him with a charge of treason. He’s acting under the veneer of humility and goodwill, but this is jumping the gun a bit.
  • The look on his face when Elsa tells him she can’t stop the winter might look like he’s resolved or resigned, but he also seems to be a bit calculating - time to change the plan.
  • Hans is always loudly proclaiming that he is loyal to the ruling sisters and they are not to be harmed. He’s always making a show of some kind. Contrast him with Kristoff, who acts as a great foil to Hans. Kristoff is unassuming, straight-talking, and a little embarrassed at the prospect of making a scene. Not a coincidence!

As for his behavior not making sense with his goals, I think some of it does. Hans is not trying to take over Arendelle by force. It’s crawling with soldiers and with so many merchants visiting at once that risk is too big for him to take. That “accident” might be too public.

So what Hans opts for instead is a more friendly, subtle takeover. He goes out of his way to please and woo the princess Anna and seems very insistent that they get married ASAP. I think, had Elsa not freaked out, he would have probably tried to be married that night.  Hans has to appear to be Anna’s ally when this happens, so he offers to go with her and then solemnly agrees to stay behind when she names him regent. He has to be so gleeful on the inside - this is precisely what he wanted! While playing at regent in Arendelle, he makes a show of supporting the sisters.  When Anna’s horse returns without her, it has to appear that Anna has died.  Still, it’s obvious that Arendelle’s people love both Anna and Elsa, so he has to go along with that and he bravely goes after her. He makes a point of taking men from the kingdom with him.  That way, they can see him showing mercy on Elsa.  After this moment, you know those men went home with that story to their families.  Hans is right where he wants to be now in the minds of the people. 

When Anna returns, Hans reveals himself to her and makes up the story about their tragic marriage.  He probably intended after this to kill Elsa and take up the crown of Arendelle. Unfortunately, Anna is a lot more awesome and intelligent than he initially took her for (and Elsa is FAR more powerful), and he instead gets shipped back to his brothers. Serves him right, the snake.

A villain song is missing here, though.  I agree with the OP that a creepy reprise of “Love is an Open Door” would have been fantastic and probably an instant classic, and it might have made Hans’ earlier subterfuge a bit easier to swallow if he’d monologued a bit in front of Anna before abandoning her.  It would have made him look even more evil, as well.  My only guess is that time got in the animators’ and editors’ way.  Hopefully some version of a villain song will be on the DVD or in the stage musical, should there ever be one.

http://frozeninarendelle.tumblr.com/post/68855661129/okay-hans-is-pretty-and-santino-is-great-but-for

frozeninarendelle:

Okay Hans is pretty and Santino is great but FOR THE LOVE OF GOD. Do not justify what he did. I’m so not here for Hans apologists, we don’t need another Loki situation here. Hans tricked Anna and he tried to brutally murder Elsa. I don’t care how tragic or lonely or desperate his childhood was,…

THANK YOU.

fly-underground:

I’m a Disney fiend and this song is so perfect and I am tearing up. 

This and the first Vuelie track have to be one of the most beautiful soundtrack scores I’ve listened to in quite some time. According to the Disney Wiki, the track is inspired by traditional Norwegian folk songs and was written by Norwegian composer Frode Fjellheim. In addition to the indigenous folk inspirations, the song also references the hymn “Fairest Lord Jesus” by Danish composer B.S. Ingemann. Absolutely gorgeous.

innerspiration:

I ship them so hard it hurts
Jack & Eliza
source:
http://watermelonwings.tumblr.com/post/68455907557

Was wondering when this would happen. Honestly, it’s a bit later than I expected. ^.^
I really liked Frozen. I loved the relationship between the two sisters, Elsa and Anna, and how their bond was at the center of the film (which was itself stunningly beautiful).

innerspiration:

I ship them so hard it hurts

Jack & Eliza

source:
http://watermelonwings.tumblr.com/post/68455907557

Was wondering when this would happen. Honestly, it’s a bit later than I expected. ^.^

I really liked Frozen. I loved the relationship between the two sisters, Elsa and Anna, and how their bond was at the center of the film (which was itself stunningly beautiful).

tusumia:

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I love these!

Created by Hyung86 on DeviantArt. And each of the characters has their own bio! See the gallery here.

forsakenwitchery:


All you have to do is wish.

I’m having a hard time seeing him as even a random genie because he’s such an Al.

Can Peter Gadiot sing? If he can, then this was definitely a missed opportunity. ^.^
forsakenwitchery:


All you have to do is wish.

I’m having a hard time seeing him as even a random genie because he’s such an Al.

Can Peter Gadiot sing? If he can, then this was definitely a missed opportunity. ^.^
forsakenwitchery:


All you have to do is wish.

I’m having a hard time seeing him as even a random genie because he’s such an Al.

Can Peter Gadiot sing? If he can, then this was definitely a missed opportunity. ^.^
forsakenwitchery:


All you have to do is wish.

I’m having a hard time seeing him as even a random genie because he’s such an Al.

Can Peter Gadiot sing? If he can, then this was definitely a missed opportunity. ^.^

forsakenwitchery:

All you have to do is wish.

I’m having a hard time seeing him as even a random genie because he’s such an Al.

Can Peter Gadiot sing? If he can, then this was definitely a missed opportunity. ^.^

Everyone Complaining About Peter Pan in Once Upon a Time

The Peter Pan from the Disney film is NOT the Peter Pan from the original story and play by J.M. Barrie. That Peter Pan was dangerous, frightening, and disturbingly lacking any sense of empathy or responsibility, much in the way of small children.

However, there was also a kind of redemption for Peter in the original story, so perhaps there will be something like that in Once too.

I for one think this unexpected turn is fascinating. I hope that the Charming family stops squabbling soon; I am already bored with it.