Cosmic Appalachia

Cosmic Appalachia

Posts tagged “NASA”

comfortspringstation:

Observers around the world are reporting a sharp increase in the brightness of sun diving Comet ISON. Formerly dim, it is now on the threshold of naked-eye visibility. Comet ISON is plunging toward the sun for a perilous pass through the solar atmosphere on Thanksgiving Day (Nov. 28th). This could be the first of many brightening events as intensifying solar heat erodes material away from the comet’s nucleus. Apparently, Comet ISON has surged in brightness by approximately 2 magnitudes in little more than 24 hours. If the trend continues, it could be a faint but easy naked-eye object by the end of the week.The sudden uptick in brightness could be caused by a fresh vein of ice opening up in the comet’s nucleus. Rapid vaporization of ice by solar heat is a sure-fire way to boost a comet’s visibility. But, as NASA’s Comet ISON Observing Campaign states, “we [really] have no idea.” The comet’s nucleus is hidden from view by a hazy green atmosphere, so events in the interior remain a mystery.http://spaceweather.com/

Good news for stargazers!

comfortspringstation:

Observers around the world are reporting a sharp increase in the brightness of sun diving Comet ISON. Formerly dim, it is now on the threshold of naked-eye visibility. Comet ISON is plunging toward the sun for a perilous pass through the solar atmosphere on Thanksgiving Day (Nov. 28th). This could be the first of many brightening events as intensifying solar heat erodes material away from the comet’s nucleus. 

Apparently, Comet ISON has surged in brightness by approximately 2 magnitudes in little more than 24 hours. If the trend continues, it could be a faint but easy naked-eye object by the end of the week.

The sudden uptick in brightness could be caused by a fresh vein of ice opening up in the comet’s nucleus. Rapid vaporization of ice by solar heat is a sure-fire way to boost a comet’s visibility. But, as NASA’s Comet ISON Observing Campaign states, “we [really] have no idea.” The comet’s nucleus is hidden from view by a hazy green atmosphere, so events in the interior remain a mystery.

http://spaceweather.com/

Good news for stargazers!

"We went to the Moon, and we discovered Earth for the first time."

To give up NASA and space exploration is to give up our dreams, our ambitions, and our future.  Let’s not think of four years into the future.  Let’s dream big!

How much would you pay for the universe?

Neil deGrasse Tyson talks about NASA, hope, and the dreams of humanity. 

Do you realize that the $850 billion bank bailout — that sum of money — is greater than the entire fifty-year running budget of NASA?

Neil deGrasse Tyson

This seems like an appropriate quote for today. 

In 2012, NASA’s budget will be less than half a percent of the total Federal Budget. This also represents 35% of the total spending on academic scientific research in the United States.

Over the past 50 years, with little more than the pocket change left over, NASA has turned science-fiction into science-fact. Space stations, human spaceflight, interplanetary exploration - this is all reality now.

Imagine what we could accomplish if we started prioritizing science.

(via spytap)

(via goldenthyme)

Curiosity has a fandom and ships. The flight director, Bobak Ferdowski, has fanart and an fyeah blog.

Tumblr, this is why you are my favorite website.

Sir Woods: Dare Mighty Things - Curiosity Landing

sirwoods:

At approximately 10:31 p.m. PT on August 5, the Mars Science Laboratory, or MSL, aka Curiosity successfully landed on Mars. Wow…just wow… I can’t explain to you guys the joy that overtook me as we got word of the successful landing. A decade of work from over 500 people came to fruition at…

THIS IS WHY I LOVE NASA AND SCIENCE. ALL OF THIS POST, RIGHT HERE.

LOVE that the internet has collectively downed NASA’s websites, even at this time of night, to geek out over Curiosity.  WAY TO GO WORLD!  WAY TO GO NASA!

Whoever is doing the Curiosity’s Twitter feed needs all the internet awards, pronto!

Whoever is doing the Curiosity’s Twitter feed needs all the internet awards, pronto!

We have wheels on Mars!

NASA scientist reacting to the Curiosity rover’s successful landing on the surface of Mars.  There are astronomers, physicists and engineers weeping at JPL right now. Really moving.

NASA JPL Infographic: Curiosity: Seven Minutes of Terror

I hope that EMTs will be provided to Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientists during the seven minutes it will take for the Curiosity rover to decelerate from 17,000 to 0 mph on its descent to the Martian surface.  The scariest part looks to be right at the very end: if the rover’s “umbilical cord” fails to be cut, the landing module could drag the rover with it on its last, doomed flight.  We’ll find out if the landing was successful at 1:30 AM EST this morning.

Happy 17th birthday, APOD!

Happy 17th birthday, APOD!

Livestream of Transit of Venus from Mauna Kea, Hawaii

Totally geeking out with the NASA scientists at Mauna Kea over the Venus transit.

Everything is so exciting! Sunspots! Venus’s atmosphere! The history of astronomy! Yay!

quantumaniac:

Tribute to 9/11 Victims on Mars. 
This piece of aluminum, recovered from the wreckage of the World Trade Centers on 9/11, is on a Mars rover exploring the red planet.
P.S; Would you mind giving us a follow on Twitter? 

Fact-checked this since I hadn’t heard it before, and it’s true! Scientists posit that these “tributes” could last for millions of years on Mars’s surface. I’m glad they’re being put to good use in the meantime.

quantumaniac:

Tribute to 9/11 Victims on Mars. 

This piece of aluminum, recovered from the wreckage of the World Trade Centers on 9/11, is on a Mars rover exploring the red planet.

P.S; Would you mind giving us a follow on Twitter

Fact-checked this since I hadn’t heard it before, and it’s true! Scientists posit that these “tributes” could last for millions of years on Mars’s surface. I’m glad they’re being put to good use in the meantime.

Hurricane Irene forms over the Atlantic Ocean, via Astronomy Picture of the Day.  NASA closely observed Irene in hopes of better understanding how Atlantic hurricanes form and move.