Some people won’t be happy until they’ve pushed you to the ground. What you have to do is have the courage to stand your ground and not give them the time of day. Hold on to your power and never give it away.

Seriously, go get this comic book.

Some people won’t be happy until they’ve pushed you to the ground. What you have to do is have the courage to stand your ground and not give them the time of day. Hold on to your power and never give it away.

Seriously, go get this comic book.

(Source: )

greyfishes:

Scenes from Batman #12

(A.K.A Harper Row Appreciation Post)

DC Comics has created a whole set of serials supposedly aimed at teens, but Batman #12, written by Scott Snyder, was the first comic they’ve published since the reboot that I thought of as a truly compelling, passionate story that spoke to teenagers.  It featured an instantly likeable and wholly developed character whose story is told in a wrenching and engrossing 20 pages of panels.  I cared deeply for them, and cried with them, a mere six pages into the book, and admired Harper’s courage and devotion to her tormented brother Cullen.  Harper Row is as classic and beloved a character as any of John Green’s heroines, as Sam from The Perks of Being a Wallflower, as Katniss from The Hunger Games, as Jolly in Virginia Wolff’s Make Lemonade.  Her financial and social situation is both relevant and emotionally potent to today’s teens, and when I set the comic down after my first reading I had the satisfying, full sensation of having just read a work of excellent YA literature.  Everything else this week paled in comparison.  DC’s actual comics for teens pale in comparison.  Absolutely incredible.

Also, Batman was in this issue. But Harper pwned him.